Flowers

Slow flowers

Since the 1990s, the flower industry too has been globalized. In 2013 the Floriculture Sustainability Initiative (FSI) was set up with the goal that 90% of flowers traded on the international market would come from sustainable farms by 2020. The slow flower movement are tending towards an alternative approach; they are choosing to grow flowers organically and outdoors, and then using short supply chains to deliver them to their customers.

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An assesment of market potential for vanilla products in East Africa

Vanilla is the second most expensive spice after saffron, because growing the vanilla seed pods is labor-intensive. Despite the expense, vanilla is highly valued for its flavor. Synthetic vanilla has been growing in popularity over the years. While the world trade in natural vanilla is at around 2,000 tonnes of cured beans or approximately 50 tonnes vanilla extract, the demand for synthetic vanillin in 2010 was more than 50,000 tonnes a year. Globally, companies prefer the chemical alternative because it is cheaper.

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Wild-collected botanicals and the EU market

The TDC carried out a market study on wild-sourced botanicals and the EU market, thus anticipating the growing opportunities for these products in the food, cosmetics and pharmaceutical industries. In this context, the study focuses on wild-collected medicinal and aromatic plants (MAPs) which have a potential for livelihoods enhancement and conservation action. Moreover, these species are assessed in terms of sustainable trade.

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Say it with flowers

In 2007, Hilary Benn, Britain’s International Development Secretary asked consumers to buy roses from Kenya because importing African flowers is better for the environment in view of the fact they are not grown in heated greenhouses. He added that it makes it easier for African people to make a decent living.
But are his arguments right? How sustainable are flowers from the South and how good are the working conditions? And what is fair trade’s role in this?

Read more »

Fair trade brings hope to vanilla producers

Few crops are as labour-intensive and time-demanding as vanilla. After saffron, vanilla is the most expensive spice in the world. Still, it brings farmers in Madagascar and elsewhere little more than dire poverty. The vanilla value chain is a complex one and competition from synthetic vanilla is deadly. Fortunately, thanks to fair trade, some vanilla producers are hopeful for the future.

Read more »

Organic spices in Tanzania: ginger, chilli and vanilla

This report examines the options that Tanzanian farmers producing certified organic ginger, chilli and vanilla have to sell their products. It maps the Tanzanian organic spices sector, as well as the international organic spices market. It discusses buyer requirements and identifies opportunities for Tanzanian organic farmers on local and international markets. Furthermore it identifies opportunities for value addition.

Read more »

Stevia: issues of a plant with a future

Since November 2011 stevia may be produced and sold in Europe. Finally… because this natural sweetener, which has been consumed in South America for centuries, has a high nutritional value and is 100% natural and safe. Because of its assets Stevia attracted the attention of multinationals who started investing massively in the crop. Fair trade and organic farming are tools that can help traditional stevia producers to take advantage of the growing demand for stevia.

Read more »

The European market for fair and sustainable flowers and plants

This report makes an attempt to capture all relevant information on the European market for fair and sustainable flowers and plants – ranging from economic structure of this market to production characteristics, and major trends in consumer preferences and behaviour. Above all, the report aims to provide insight into the role of the various social and environmental standards in the main European flower and plant markets and sales channels.

Read more »

Slow flowers

Since the 1990s, the flower industry too has been globalized. In 2013 the Floriculture Sustainability Initiative (FSI) was set up with the goal that 90% of flowers traded on the international market would come from sustainable farms by 2020. The slow flower movement are tending towards an alternative approach; they are choosing to grow flowers organically and outdoors, and then using short supply chains to deliver them to their customers.

Read more »

An assesment of market potential for vanilla products in East Africa

Vanilla is the second most expensive spice after saffron, because growing the vanilla seed pods is labor-intensive. Despite the expense, vanilla is highly valued for its flavor. Synthetic vanilla has been growing in popularity over the years. While the world trade in natural vanilla is at around 2,000 tonnes of cured beans or approximately 50 tonnes vanilla extract, the demand for synthetic vanillin in 2010 was more than 50,000 tonnes a year. Globally, companies prefer the chemical alternative because it is cheaper.

Read more »

Wild-collected botanicals and the EU market

The TDC carried out a market study on wild-sourced botanicals and the EU market, thus anticipating the growing opportunities for these products in the food, cosmetics and pharmaceutical industries. In this context, the study focuses on wild-collected medicinal and aromatic plants (MAPs) which have a potential for livelihoods enhancement and conservation action. Moreover, these species are assessed in terms of sustainable trade.

Read more »

Say it with flowers

In 2007, Hilary Benn, Britain’s International Development Secretary asked consumers to buy roses from Kenya because importing African flowers is better for the environment in view of the fact they are not grown in heated greenhouses. He added that it makes it easier for African people to make a decent living.
But are his arguments right? How sustainable are flowers from the South and how good are the working conditions? And what is fair trade’s role in this?

Read more »

Fair trade brings hope to vanilla producers

Few crops are as labour-intensive and time-demanding as vanilla. After saffron, vanilla is the most expensive spice in the world. Still, it brings farmers in Madagascar and elsewhere little more than dire poverty. The vanilla value chain is a complex one and competition from synthetic vanilla is deadly. Fortunately, thanks to fair trade, some vanilla producers are hopeful for the future.

Read more »

Organic spices in Tanzania: ginger, chilli and vanilla

This report examines the options that Tanzanian farmers producing certified organic ginger, chilli and vanilla have to sell their products. It maps the Tanzanian organic spices sector, as well as the international organic spices market. It discusses buyer requirements and identifies opportunities for Tanzanian organic farmers on local and international markets. Furthermore it identifies opportunities for value addition.

Read more »

Stevia: issues of a plant with a future

Since November 2011 stevia may be produced and sold in Europe. Finally… because this natural sweetener, which has been consumed in South America for centuries, has a high nutritional value and is 100% natural and safe. Because of its assets Stevia attracted the attention of multinationals who started investing massively in the crop. Fair trade and organic farming are tools that can help traditional stevia producers to take advantage of the growing demand for stevia.

Read more »

The European market for fair and sustainable flowers and plants

This report makes an attempt to capture all relevant information on the European market for fair and sustainable flowers and plants – ranging from economic structure of this market to production characteristics, and major trends in consumer preferences and behaviour. Above all, the report aims to provide insight into the role of the various social and environmental standards in the main European flower and plant markets and sales channels.

Read more »

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